An article of the group elected as cover in a special issue on Flow Chemistry

A paper on the Reformatsky and Blaise reaction in Flow in collaboration with JANSSEN, S.A. has been published in a special issue of Green Chemsitry on Flow chemistry and has been elected as the cover of the issue.

Review on the use of NMR spectroscopy in flow chemistry

This review show the recent advances in the use of flow chemistry with in-line and on-line analysis by NMR. It cover from the use macro- and, microreactors, standard and custom made NMR probes involving microcoils, high resolution and benchtop NMR instruments and the use of DOE and automatic reaction monitoring and automatization. Selected applications have been collected … Continue reading

Book chapter on flow Chemistry

A new book chapter on the use of non-conventional techniques in sustainable chematry under flow conditions has been published by our group. The chapter it is included in the book Sustainable Flow Chemistry – Chapter 9. Methods and Applications.  Edited by L. Vaccaro and published by Wiley-VCH.

Un artículo del grupo portada de Chemistry

The stereoselective synthesis of 1,3-diaminotruxillic acid derivatives has been achieved in high yields and short reaction times. The procedure starts from simple 5(4H)- oxazolones and is based on an efficient combination of CH orthopalladation, [2+2]-photocycloaddition on continuous flow microreactors using visible light from LED sources, and hydrogenation to selectively afford the epsilon isomer.  

Chem. Comm. for the group!!

Good news! The group has published a new article in the Chemical Communication magazine. Here we have all the data to access the article: On-line monitoring of a microwave-assisted chemical reaction by nanoliter NMR-spectroscopy M Gomez, Hein Verputten, Angel Diaz-Ortiz, Andres Moreno, Antonio de la Hoz, Aldrik Velders. The authors report the use of a … Continue reading

Simple, ingenious way to create lab-on-a-chip devices could become a model for teaching and research

With little more than a conventional photocopier and transparency film, anyone can build a functional microfluidic chip. A local Cambridge high school physics teacher invented the process; now, thanks to a new undergraduate teaching lab at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), students will be able explore microfluidics and its applications. Original article: Simple, … Continue reading